Coachella residents support fines to prevent graffiti

Jul. 27, 2014 / By

JOHNNY FLORES AND AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

Coachella — Adults and youth interviewed by Coachella Unincorporated support the city’s recent decision to fine parents of minors who are accused of vandalizing public and private property.

“I think Coachella fining parents will result in a positive way for my community because vandalism and graffiti is ugly and unnecessary,” Isaac Arreola, 16, said. “I feel the fines will make [young people] think twice before doing it again.”

Earlier this month, the city filed a civil lawsuit against two families whose children are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors in an effort to help cover the cost of repairing the damaged public and private properties.

“I think it’s a good idea because it’s a good lesson for parents to learn how to better raise their children,” Sonia Villareal, who has lived in Coachella for more than 10 years, said. “I get angry because I’ve been to new buildings here in Coachella, and it’s only a matter of months or days after the buildings are open till they are vandalized, and there’s graffiti in the bathrooms.”

Another Coachella resident, Mike Lopez, said while he agrees with the city’s decision to hold parents responsible for their children’s actions, he thinks the fined amount might be too much for parents to pay.

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Articles, Featured — July 25, 2014 2:43 pm

Coachella residents support fines to prevent graffiti

Posted by Coachella Unincorporated

[Translate]


On Tuesday July 8, 2014, the city of Coachella filed a civil lawsuit against the parents of three minors, who are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors. Photo: AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

 

JOHNNY FLORES AND AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

Coachella — Adults and youth interviewed by Coachella Unincorporated support the city’s recent decision to fine parents of minors who are accused of vandalizing public and private property.

“I think Coachella fining parents will result in a positive way for my community because vandalism and graffiti is ugly and unnecessary,” Isaac Arreola, 16, said. “I feel the fines will make [young people] think twice before doing it again.”

Earlier this month, the city filed a civil lawsuit against two families whose children are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors in an effort to help cover the cost of repairing the damaged public and private properties.

“I think it’s a good idea because it’s a good lesson for parents to learn how to better raise their children,” Sonia Villareal, who has lived in Coachella for more than 10 years, said. “I get angry because I’ve been to new buildings here in Coachella, and it’s only a matter of months or days after the buildings are open till they are vandalized, and there’s graffiti in the bathrooms.”

Another Coachella resident, Mike Lopez, said while he agrees with the city’s decision to hold parents responsible for their children’s actions, he thinks the fined amount might be too much for parents to pay.

– See more at: http://coachellaunincorporated.org/2014/07/25/coachella-fines-graffiti/#sthash.nyYFVaZo.dpuf

Articles, Featured — July 25, 2014 2:43 pm

Coachella residents support fines to prevent graffiti

Posted by Coachella Unincorporated

[Translate]


On Tuesday July 8, 2014, the city of Coachella filed a civil lawsuit against the parents of three minors, who are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors. Photo: AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

 

JOHNNY FLORES AND AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

Coachella — Adults and youth interviewed by Coachella Unincorporated support the city’s recent decision to fine parents of minors who are accused of vandalizing public and private property.

“I think Coachella fining parents will result in a positive way for my community because vandalism and graffiti is ugly and unnecessary,” Isaac Arreola, 16, said. “I feel the fines will make [young people] think twice before doing it again.”

Earlier this month, the city filed a civil lawsuit against two families whose children are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors in an effort to help cover the cost of repairing the damaged public and private properties.

“I think it’s a good idea because it’s a good lesson for parents to learn how to better raise their children,” Sonia Villareal, who has lived in Coachella for more than 10 years, said. “I get angry because I’ve been to new buildings here in Coachella, and it’s only a matter of months or days after the buildings are open till they are vandalized, and there’s graffiti in the bathrooms.”

Another Coachella resident, Mike Lopez, said while he agrees with the city’s decision to hold parents responsible for their children’s actions, he thinks the fined amount might be too much for parents to pay.

– See more at: http://coachellaunincorporated.org/2014/07/25/coachella-fines-graffiti/#sthash.nyYFVaZo.dpuf

JOHNNY FLORES AND AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

Coachella — Adults and youth interviewed by Coachella Unincorporated support the city’s recent decision to fine parents of minors who are accused of vandalizing public and private property.

“I think Coachella fining parents will result in a positive way for my community because vandalism and graffiti is ugly and unnecessary,” Isaac Arreola, 16, said. “I feel the fines will make [young people] think twice before doing it again.”

Earlier this month, the city filed a civil lawsuit against two families whose children are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors in an effort to help cover the cost of repairing the damaged public and private properties.

“I think it’s a good idea because it’s a good lesson for parents to learn how to better raise their children,” Sonia Villareal, who has lived in Coachella for more than 10 years, said. “I get angry because I’ve been to new buildings here in Coachella, and it’s only a matter of months or days after the buildings are open till they are vandalized, and there’s graffiti in the bathrooms.”

Another Coachella resident, Mike Lopez, said while he agrees with the city’s decision to hold parents responsible for their children’s actions, he thinks the fined amount might be too much for parents to pay.

– See more at: http://coachellaunincorporated.org/2014/07/25/coachella-fines-graffiti/#sthash.nyYFVaZo.dpuf

JOHNNY FLORES AND AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

Coachella — Adults and youth interviewed by Coachella Unincorporated support the city’s recent decision to fine parents of minors who are accused of vandalizing public and private property.

“I think Coachella fining parents will result in a positive way for my community because vandalism and graffiti is ugly and unnecessary,” Isaac Arreola, 16, said. “I feel the fines will make [young people] think twice before doing it again.”

Earlier this month, the city filed a civil lawsuit against two families whose children are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors in an effort to help cover the cost of repairing the damaged public and private properties.

“I think it’s a good idea because it’s a good lesson for parents to learn how to better raise their children,” Sonia Villareal, who has lived in Coachella for more than 10 years, said. “I get angry because I’ve been to new buildings here in Coachella, and it’s only a matter of months or days after the buildings are open till they are vandalized, and there’s graffiti in the bathrooms.”

Another Coachella resident, Mike Lopez, said while he agrees with the city’s decision to hold parents responsible for their children’s actions, he thinks the fined amount might be too much for parents to pay.

– See more at: http://coachellaunincorporated.org/2014/07/25/coachella-fines-graffiti/#sthash.nyYFVaZo.dpuf

JOHNNY FLORES AND AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

Coachella — Adults and youth interviewed by Coachella Unincorporated support the city’s recent decision to fine parents of minors who are accused of vandalizing public and private property.

“I think Coachella fining parents will result in a positive way for my community because vandalism and graffiti is ugly and unnecessary,” Isaac Arreola, 16, said. “I feel the fines will make [young people] think twice before doing it again.”

Earlier this month, the city filed a civil lawsuit against two families whose children are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors in an effort to help cover the cost of repairing the damaged public and private properties.

“I think it’s a good idea because it’s a good lesson for parents to learn how to better raise their children,” Sonia Villareal, who has lived in Coachella for more than 10 years, said. “I get angry because I’ve been to new buildings here in Coachella, and it’s only a matter of months or days after the buildings are open till they are vandalized, and there’s graffiti in the bathrooms.”

Another Coachella resident, Mike Lopez, said while he agrees with the city’s decision to hold parents responsible for their children’s actions, he thinks the fined amount might be too much for parents to pay.

– See more at: http://coachellaunincorporated.org/2014/07/25/coachella-fines-graffiti/#sthash.nyYFVaZo.dpuf

JOHNNY FLORES AND AMBER AMAYA/Coachella Uninc

Coachella — Adults and youth interviewed by Coachella Unincorporated support the city’s recent decision to fine parents of minors who are accused of vandalizing public and private property.

“I think Coachella fining parents will result in a positive way for my community because vandalism and graffiti is ugly and unnecessary,” Isaac Arreola, 16, said. “I feel the fines will make [young people] think twice before doing it again.”

Earlier this month, the city filed a civil lawsuit against two families whose children are accused of committing 19 acts of vandalism during April 2014. The city is seeking $6,130 from the parents of the accused minors in an effort to help cover the cost of repairing the damaged public and private properties.

“I think it’s a good idea because it’s a good lesson for parents to learn how to better raise their children,” Sonia Villareal, who has lived in Coachella for more than 10 years, said. “I get angry because I’ve been to new buildings here in Coachella, and it’s only a matter of months or days after the buildings are open till they are vandalized, and there’s graffiti in the bathrooms.”

Another Coachella resident, Mike Lopez, said while he agrees with the city’s decision to hold parents responsible for their children’s actions, he thinks the fined amount might be too much for parents to pay.

– See more at: http://coachellaunincorporated.org/2014/07/25/coachella-fines-graffiti/#sthash.nyYFVaZo.dpuf

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VoiceWaves is a Long Beach youth-led journalism and media-training project. The youth, ages 16-24, are learning to report, write, and create digital journalism content. Their reports will raise awareness of community health issues and activate change.